Sir Miles

Warren

Sir M Wa01

Sir Miles Warren’s Biography

Discipline:
Architect
Awards:
Arts Foundation Icon 2003
Highlight:
Acclaimed Christchurch architect Sir Miles Warren has been at the forefront of New Zealand architecture since 1955.

Born in Christchurch in 1929, Sir Miles Warren gained work experience in London after completing his architecture degree. He was influenced by the new brutalist movement, which was committed to the functionalist principles of modernism and emphasised the expressive qualities of building materials and systems. Back in Christchurch in 1955 he designed the renowned group of small flats in Dorset St, Christchurch, which became the forerunner for what is commonly referred to "the Christchurch style". It formed the basis for many single and multi-unit houses, generating a regionally distinctive domestic architecture.

A commission for the Christchurch Dental School in 1958 initiated a partnership with Maurice Mahoney. As an indication of their future success, their first collaboration in the design for the Dental School won them national recognition as well as an NZIA Gold Award. The 1960s saw the new architectural practice develop their trademark approach, and a commission for the Christchurch College in 1964 provided the opportunity to translate it into more complex planning. Commissions over the next decade included the Christchurch Town Hall, the New Zealand Chancery in Washington, the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington, and the Civic Offices in Rotorua.

In 1974 Warren was awarded a CBE and in 1985 a KBE, both for his Services to Architecture. Sir Miles was given the country's highest honour in 1995, when he was admitted to the Order of New Zealand. He received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Auckland in 2001 and one of two top honours in Canterbury's Business Awards in September 2007.